Gratitude

Gratitude is a highly underestimated virtue. We go through the rigmarole of life without acknowledging or thanking life for the various gifts that it showers on us. We accept them as pure coincidences or just a matter of good luck.

I think gratitude towards our loved ones is becoming a thing of the past. Somewhere we take them for granted and believe that they were just doing their role. We often forget that they did not simply do their roles mechanically; they also  ensured that we were made to feel special and gave us the warmth that we needed.

I was reintroduced to the concept of gratitude when I was reading a book on Positive Psychology. In the book they talk about “Naikan” a Japanese technique of reflection. The technique can be used on a daily basis. The word Naikan means inside looking or introspection.It is primarily based on 3 questions:

What have I received from…

What have I given to…

What troubles and difficulties have I caused to…

The purpose is to use these questions to help one bring focus to how one has contributed and how one’s life has been enriched by the existing relationships and interactions that one may engage in on a daily basis or over an extended period of time.

Try using the technique and see how it impacts you.

Will do the next blog on guidelines to increase one’s sense of gratitude.

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The Rose Garden

ineverpromised

Books have always come into my life in strange ways, giving me answers I deeply seek.

I still remember there was a rare book, which I just found in an exhibition and no one knew who it belonged to. I waited for two days, finally took it home and the book changed me.

This book, “I Never Promised You a Rose Garden” gave me answers to some of my existential anxiety that came in with the thought of becoming a therapist. Over the years I have learnt that when a client walks into the room, you never know the way forward.

As a therapist I begin with faith and most clients beautifully create their own rose garden, equally accepting the thorns that come with it.

Therapy is constantly a story of human will and strength.

P.S. In case you were interested, the book is now easily available online

Origins of Therapy Sherapy

This one time, a few relatives came over to visit. After the greetings and formalities, the dreaded question arose – “So what are you doing these days?”  It can often get difficult communicating what I really do as a therapist, and why does the world need more of our kind (read narcissism).

As I begin my long and oft-repeated job description, my uncle interrupts – “The girl is in to ‘Therapy Sherapy’”, to which everyone looked at me and while nodding approvingly. “Oh, good work, good work”, one said.

I look at my husband and say “Therapy Sherapy?!?” The term almost has a lightness attached to it and a desi-ness that intrigues me.

A profession that’s all about complexity of human mind, human potential and layered with intricate emotions becomes Therapy Sherapy.

I call this – Indianization of my professional avatar.

Sonali Gupta, a Therapist Sherapist.